school resources

Hi Skwirkers! Coming up on the 26th of January is Australia Day. Skwirk explores Australia Day to help develop students’ understanding of its history and customs.

Jump on to the Skwirk Facebook page to tell us about your favourite Australia Day classroom activities.

History

Australia day commemorates the landing of the First Fleet in Sydney Cove on the 26th January, 1788. The First Fleet arrived on 11 ships, with about 1000 people on board. The fleet was sent to Australia to start a colony. This colony was made up primarily of prisoners. These prisoners committed mostly petty crimes such as stealing a loaf of bread or fraud.

The first ‘official’ Australia Day was held in 1801 by Governor Lachlan Macquarie to mark 30 years of European settlement.

How do people celebrate?

Australia Day is a nationwide public holiday. It is celebrated across the country with official and unofficial events and firework displays. Some people host barbeques, others play a round of cricket and others go to the beach. A lot of people also like to dress up on Australia Day with clothes that have the Australian flag on them.

Australia Day or Invasion Day?

When Captain Cook landed in Australia he declared the land ‘Terra Nullius’, which means land belonging to no one. Cook decided that because of the way the Aboriginal people lived it was not their land. The Aboriginal people did not show their ownership with fences or markers, like people in Europe. Cook decided that the British could colonise. This decision led to Australia’s Indigenous people losing all their rights to the land. The fight for land rights is still going on today. This is why some Aboriginal people chose not to celebrate Australia day as it was the day the Europeans took their land. A lot of them see the say as ‘Invasion Day’ or ‘Survival Day’.

Useful teaching and learning resources

Free downloadable resources

Simply click on the links below to access the free resources we have created on our TeachersPayTeachers account.

Skwirk resources

Log into Skwirk to get access to online resources (don’t have an account? Subscribe now or start a free trial). Once you have logged in, click on the links below to access each chapter.

Great Australia Day books

Check your local library or book shop to find the following books, hand-picked by Skwirk teachers.

  • An Aussie Year: Twelve Months in the life of Australian Kids – Tania McCartney
  • A is for Australia – Frane Lessac
  • Why I Love Australia – Bronwyn Bancroft
  • Are We There Yet? – Alison Lester
  • My Place – Nadia Wheatley and Donna Rawlin
  • Meet Captain Cook – Rae Murdie
  • Ernie Dances to the Didgeridoo – Alison Lester
  • Wombat Stew – Marcia Vaughan
  • Possum Magic – Mem Fox and Julie Vivas
  • Waltzing Matilda – A.B (Banjo) Paterson
  • The Rainbow Serpent – Dick Roughsey
  • My Country – Dorothea Mackellar
  • Where the Forest Meets the Sea – Jeanie Baker

Engaging Videos

Students love watching videos! The following videos on Australia Day are engaging and educational.

It’s no secret that Australian public schools are under-funded and under-resourced. Hard working teachers and principals all over the country work to bring a high-quality education to millions of students, despite the lack of support. What’s more, teachers are coming under increasing pressure to meet a diverse range of learning needs and styles, deliver innovative lessons and prepare students for complex jobs. Even the most hard-working, talented, experienced teachers can find themselves under extreme stress.

Why reinvent the wheel?

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Teachers are using Skwirk across multiple platforms.

That’s where Skwirk comes in. We know that, between delivering lessons, marking, assessments and keeping parents happy, teachers and principals have their work cut out for them. So we thought we might help. We’ve developed a truly enormous range of online education tools and teacher resources, in order to help Australia’s educators save both money and time. Our site contains more than 18,000 classroom-ready resources – from iPad resources to interactive whiteboard resources to education videos. Literally years and years of educational expertise and experience have gone into their development.

Teaching the Australian curriculum

All the main subject areas of the Australian curriculum are covered – from the English curriculum and the history curriculum to the maths curriculum and the science curriculum. Students of all ages – from kindergarten level to Year 10 – are taken care of.

Thousands of resources in one location

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Boomerang Maths – One of over 1000 interactive games.

Whether you’re a secondary principal who wants to help teachers across a range of faculties or a primary teacher who needs to address numerous subject areas every day, Skwirk can come in really handy. Rather than having to subscribe to several different sites, you only need one account, and you’ll find everything you need at your fingertips.

All resources are well organised, not only according to subject areas, but according to topics, too. Whether teachers need to explain the intricate details of the Australian federal parliament or how to categorise the country’s native flora and fauna, there are complete unit plans available. Lessons are supplemented with rigorous assessment and reporting tools, so teachers can keep a close eye on students’ progress and provide supplementary lessons whenever necessary.

Meeting a range of teaching and learning strategies

We know that students learn in a variety of ways. And that’s why Skwirk has resources covering a range of strategies – whether pupils learn best visually or kinaesthetically, there are plenty of options for them, from amazing animations to interactive games. Teachers can mix and match a range of activity styles to best meet the needs of their classes.

Get a Skwirk trial today: Click here

Alternatively get a quote for your school. Email us: teachers@skwirk.com.au

The iPad was introduced in 2010, providing a compact and highly portable, yet accessible, medium through which to reach the internet, as well as a number of other functions. User numbers have grown significantly in recent years, with iPads being employed not only for work and entertainment, but also as an educational tool. This latter application has provoked considerable controversy, with some experts suggesting that screen use is detrimental to academic success, whilst others feel there are significant benefits to e-learning. Take a look at the benefits an iPad can bring to your child’s education, as well as the advantages of ensuring high quality textbooks are readily available as a learning resource.

Fast, portable and convenient

Unfortunately, textbooks can be heavy and cumbersome to transport. Even using a textbook can be time consuming and frustrating, as finding the information you need is frequently a challenge. In comparison, an iPad is light enough for smaller children to carry easily, can be used anywhere and most learners can find the information they need in a few minutes, making it ideal for flexible learning. A single device is all that’s needed to access comprehensive information on a wide range of subjects. Sites such as Skwirk, for example, contain over 16,000 learning resources, covering curriculum material for four to 14 year-olds.

Range of learning mediums

Textbooks contain writing, diagrams and photographs, but little else. This can make learning a dry process and can often deter children from wanting to find out more about a topic. One of the major advantages of e-learning is that in addition to these methods of conveying information, children can also enjoy video clips and animation, adding interest to the learning experience. Different presentations of the same information allow children to find a method which suits them best, enhancing retention and engagement.

Interactive

Textbooks contain plenty of useful facts and figures, but do not present opportunities for interaction. Conversely an iPad can provide numerous tests, quizzes, assessments and puzzles which encourage learners to remain attentive and retain the information they need. For children who have trouble concentrating, an iPad can work wonderfully well as an aid to study.

Appealing

Those of us who remember the pre-digital age will frequently favour textbooks, as they are familiar – a tried and tested method of obtaining high-calibre information when you need it. Whilst this is still the case, it’s important to recognise that premium, interactive content is frequently a more appealing way of learning for young people. The use of iPads doesn’t negate textbook use; rather it offers a route for accessing information which better suits many young people today, complementing more traditional methods.

Textbooks continue to play a major part in many educational experiences, particularly for advanced learners who need to access niche subject matter. For school aged children, an iPad which gives them access to high quality educational material can be of real benefit in enriching their learning experience in a wide range of subjects.